Basic Features

Basic Features

Enable the Easy Start Feature

By default, User Environment Manager does not manage any applications or environment settings after you install it. You must specify which applications and settings to manage. Although this approach takes a little more work up front, this solution prevents excessive profile growth and profile corruption, enables user settings to roam across Windows versions, and gives you granular control to manage as much or as little of the user experience as needed.

To help with getting started, the Easy Start button instantly adds many common Windows applications, including several versions of Microsoft Office, to the whitelist of applications managed by User Environment Manager. Many Windows environment settings are also added by Easy Start. You can then easily select an application or Windows setting to review and change the default settings.

Prerequisites for Using Easy Start

To perform this exercise, you need the following:

  • Credentials for the virtual or physical machine where you installed and performed the initial configuration of the User Environment Manager Management Console, as described in Configure the User Environment Manager Management Console.
  • (Recommended but not required) Microsoft Office installed on the virtual desktop or RDSH server that you want to manage. You will be prompted to select the version of Microsoft Office that is installed. 

1. Open the User Environment Manager Configuration File

The path to the file is \\<file-share-server>\UEM_Config\Immidio Flex Profiles Configuration.xml. For the example in this exercise, the path is \\file\UEM_Config\Immidio Flex Profiles Configuration.xml. Note that the file contains no application-specific settings yet.

2. Navigate to the General Folder

For the example in this exercise, the path is \\file\UEM_Config\General. Note that the folder is empty. Application-specific files are created in this folder when you configure User Environment Manager to manage an application.

3. Start the User Environment Manager Management Console

  1. On the physical or virtual machine where the Management Console is installed, from the Start screen, select the Management Console shortcut in the VMware UEM folder.
  2. On the Personalization tab, note that in the left pane, no applications are listed under General. At this point, User Environment Manager is not managing any applications or Windows settings.

4. Click the Easy Start Toolbar Button

Clicking this button allows User Environment Manager to manage many common Windows applications.

5. Select the Versions of Microsoft Office

  1. Select the version or versions that are installed on the virtual desktop or RDSH server that you want to manage.
  2. Select OK in the confirmation dialog box that appears.

6. Examine the List of Common Applications Installed with Easy Start

In the left pane, under General, you see a list of commonly installed Windows applications. These applications will now be managed with User Environment Manager.

By default, when users log in and change application settings for these applications, their personalizations will be saved when they close the application. For example, if the user logs in to an instant-clone desktop and changes application settings, when the user logs out of the instant-clone desktop, the VM is destroyed. When the user logs in to a new instant-clone desktop and starts the application, the user will see that the settings were saved. The user has the experience of persistence even though the user logs in to a different instant-clone VM.

7. Examine the List of Office Applications and Windows Settings

These applications and Windows settings are now managed by User Environment Manager. You can examine the default settings and make any desired changes.

8. Open the Applications Folder in the General Folder

Navigate to the Applications folder on the configuration share. For this exercise, the path is \\file\UEM_Config\General\Applications. Note that this folder did not exist before you clicked the Easy Start toolbar button. Scroll through the list of application files in this folder. Common types of files include:

  • Application icon files – Files with the .ico extension.
  • Application configuration files – Files with the .ini extension.
  • Flag files – Files with the .INI.flag extension, which are for configuring the application to use the DirectFlex feature. With DirectFlex enabled, the User Environment Manager profile archives settings are imported and read when the user starts the application, rather than when the user logs in to the machine. Application settings are saved (exported) when the user quits the application, rather than when the user logs out of the machine.

The Applications folder contains settings for the common applications included with Easy Start. If you also selected to enable personalization for a Microsoft Office version, a folder for that version of Office also appears in the General folder.

A Windows Settings folder is also created in the General folder. Flag files are almost never used for these settings because the DirectFlex feature applies only to application settings. Except for things like integrated IE or Edge browser cache settings, Windows settings are usually imported and exported at OS login and OS logout, respectively.

The following Easy Start video provides a detailed demonstration of the steps outlined in this exercise. If you need additional detail, you can find it here. If you already completed the Easy Start configuration, feel free to skip the video. This video is 2 minutes.

Test Application Personalization

With the application personalization feature, end users can roam between disparate devices while preserving custom application settings and Windows personalization settings. When a user logs in to a virtual desktop or application, User Environment Manager reads the profile archive file for that user's profile and can, for example, display the desktop background or application settings that the user saved during the last session.

In this exercise, you will log in to a physical or virtual machine as an end user, open an application, change some application settings, log out, and then log in again and verify that the settings have been persisted across sessions. You can even log in from different devices if you like.

The following section, Personalization of Application and Windows Settings, provides more background information on the settings. (Approximate read time: 1 minute)

Prerequisites

In the example for this exercise, we use a virtual desktop VM that is part of a Horizon 7 setup, though this is not required. You can use whatever physical or virtual machine you used to install the agent, as described in Install the User Environment Manager Agent (FlexEngine) on the Desktop or RDSH Server or Install the User Environment Manager Agent in NoAD Mode.

If you are using a Horizon 7 environment, you will need to have access to the virtual desktop pool that has the User Environment Manager agent installed, and you will need Horizon Client or the web-based HTML Access client for logging in to the VM.

Before you begin this exercise, you also must complete the Enable the Easy Start Feature exercise, which includes enabling one or more of the Microsoft Office application templates.

2. Log In to a Virtual Desktop as an End User

For the example in this exercise, we are using a Horizon 7 instant-clone desktop, and we access it through the VMware Workspace™ ONE™ catalog.

3. Watch the Profile Archive Folder Get Created

As soon as the login process begins, a new folder is created on the profile archive share. The folder is named according to the user name of the user logging in.

At this point, the agent on the virtual desktop is importing the User Environment Manager settings from the configuration files in the General folder on the configuration share.

4. Verify Settings Have Been Imported

After login is complete and the desktop appears, note that several desktop shortcuts have been created by the Easy Start feature, including Calculator (Created by VMware UEM). Other examples include MS Paint, Notepad, and Wordpad.

For a list of application shortcuts created by the Easy Start feature, you can go to the User Environment tab in the Management Console and select Shortcuts in the left pane, as shown in the following figure.

5. Open PowerPoint

  1. From the Start screen of the virtual desktop, click the Start button, select All Apps, and click to expand Microsoft Office 2016 (created by VMware UEM).
  2. Select Powerpoint 2016.

Note: If, when completing the Easy Start exercise, you selected a different Microsoft Office version, navigate to that version.

6. Open a Blank PowerPoint Presentation

  1. If PowerPoint prompts you to accept the license agreement, for the update option, select Ask me later, and click Accept for the license agreement.
  2. In the list of templates, select Blank Presentation.

Note: At this point, if you look in the profile archive Archives folder for the user, you see only an Applications folder and a Logs folder. No folders for Microsoft Office applications appear yet because this is the first time the user has started an Office application.

For the example in this exercise, the path to this folder is \\<file-share>\UEM_Profiles\<username>\Archives\

In the Applications folder, the only application file you can see is for Notepad because Notepad is used to import settings.

7. Change Some Default View Settings

  1. Select the View tab.
  2. Select the Ruler, Guidelines, and Guides check boxes.
  3. Close PowerPoint.
  4. Log out of the virtual desktop OS.

After you log out of the VM, all the default settings for Microsoft Office applications, and the settings you changed for PowerPoint, are saved to the profile archives share.

8. Verify That Application Settings Are Saved to the Profile Archives

Navigate to the Archives folder for the user and verify that a folder for Microsoft Office has been created. For the example in this exercise, the path to the Archives folder is \\<file-share>\UEM_Profiles\<username>\Archives\, and a Microsoft Office 2016 folder is created.

9. Examine the Archives for Microsoft Office

Open the Microsoft Office 2016 folder, and scroll through the list of files.

The PowerPoint.zip file contains settings used when you closed the application, including the settings you changed on the View tab. The other ZIP files in this folder contain default settings for the other Microsoft Office applications.

10. Log In Again to See Persistent Settings

  1. Log in to the virtual desktop as the same end user.
  2. Start PowerPoint, and select Blank Presentation again.
  3. Note that the ruler, gridlines, and guides are shown rather than hidden.

If you are using a Horizon 7 instant-clone desktop, the VM that you first logged in to was destroyed, and this new desktop still displays the PowerPoint settings you chose using the previous VM.

If you are using a full-clone desktop, you might be able to replicate this experience by reverting the VM back to a snapshot taken before you ever logged in for the first time. When you log in after reverting, you will still see the personalized PowerPoint settings.

If you are using a physical PC, which would ordinarily persist the settings whether or not you are using User Environment Manager, you can test this feature by removing the user profile before you log in again. Alternatively, you can log in to a different physical PC.

This exercise demonstrates how User Environment Manger, when used in conjunction with stateless virtual desktops, can give the experience of persistent, stateful desktops.

The following App Personalization video provides a detailed demonstration of the steps outlined in this exercise. If you need additional detail, you can find it here. If you already completed the Application Personalization exercise, feel free to skip the video. This video is 2 minutes.

Create an Application Template with Application Profiler

For applications that do not have a corresponding application management template, you can use the Application Profiler, a standalone application that analyzes where an application stores its file and registry configuration. The analysis results in an optimized User Environment Manager Flex configuration file, which you can edit in the Application Profiler or use directly. You can also use Application Profiler to set the initial configuration state of applications.

In this exercise, you will install the Application Profiler tool, which is included in the User Environment Manager installation package. After Application Profiler is installed in a provisioning VM, you can run the tool to open the application you want to profile, change some settings, and then create a template you can use to manage the application for your end users.

The following section, Introduction to User Environment Manager Application Profiler, provides additional background. (Approximate read time: 1 minute)

Prerequisites for Using Application Profiler

To perform this exercise, you need the following:

  • Provisioning machine – The machine that you use to profile the application must use the same Windows OS version and similar patch version as the machine that your end users will use. For supported Windows versions, see Application Profiler System Requirements.
    Note: The provisioning machine must not have the User Environment Manager agent installed on it. VMware recommends that the provisioning machine not have any additional applications installed aside from those included with the OS and VMware Tools, if you are using a VM.
  • User account – When you log in to the provisioning machine to run the Application Profiler installer, the account you use must have administrative privileges.
  • Installer – The Application Profiler installer is included in the User Environment Manager installation package, in the Optional Components folder. If necessary, you can download the package from the Product Evaluation Center or  the VMware Downloads page. The installer is an architecture-specific (x86 or x64) MSI file.
  • Internet access – The installation process includes a certificate revocation check to verify the digital signature of the MSI file. This check requires Internet access.
  • Application to profile – For the example used in this exercise, you can download the Notepad++ application. The application that you profile must be the same version that is installed in the machine that your end users will use.

    Note: Application Profiler can profile applications that are installed natively in virtual desktops or RDSH servers, as well as applications that are delivered by VMware App Volumes AppStacks.

1. Place the Installer in a Suitable Location

For this example, we downloaded the installer to a provisioning VM hosted on an ESXi server. To connect to this VM, called Provision, you would select the VM in the inventory list and select Launch Remote Console.

If you are performing this exercise in your own lab, you can download and extract the Application Profiler installer file, which is located in the Optional Components folder of the installation package, and copy the file to the system where it will run or to a location accessible to the system.

2. Run the Installer

  1. Log in to the provisioning machine, and browse to the location of the Application Profiler installer.
  2. Double-click the installer file to start the wizard, and follow the prompts. You can accept all the defaults.

Tip: (Optional) After installation is complete, shut down the machine and take a VM snapshot. With a VM snapshot of the machine, you can easily revert the machine to its pristine condition after you finish profiling an application. You can then use the machine to profile a different application, and so on.

3. Install the Application to Be Profiled

  1. On the provisioning machine, browse to the location of the installer for the application you want to profile.
    For the example in this exercise, we used  the Notepad++ application, but you can use any application that your end users will use. Be sure to use the same version that your end users have.
  2. Double-click the installer file to start the wizard, and follow the prompts. If you are installing Notepad++, configure the following options in the installation wizard:
    • De-select the Auto-Updater check box.
    • Select the Localization check box.
    • Select the Create Shortcut on Desktop check box.

Important: VMware recommends that, if possible, you install the application so that automatic updating is disabled, especially if you use instant clones. For the purposes of this exercise, enable localization packs, as shown in the following figure. In this exercise, we will test profile settings by changing the language used in the UI.

4. Start Application Profiler

From the All Programs list on the provisioning machine, Application Profiler is located in the VMware UEM folder.

5. Start the Profiling Session

  1. Click Start Session.
  2. Browse to and select the application.

After you click OK, Application Profiler opens the application to be profiled and begins monitoring the changes you make and where those changes are saved in the Windows registry and file system.

For example, the VLC Player application saves some changes to .ini files and some to the Windows registry. For more information, see Profiling Applications with VMware User Environment Manager, Part 2: Applying and Troubleshooting Predefined Settings.

6. Make Some Changes to the Application

  1. From the menu bar, select Settings > Preferences.
  2. From the Toolbar list, select Big icons.
  3. De-select the Show status bar check box.
  4. Close the application.

Application Profiler saves the changes you made, and prompts you to confirm that profiling is finished, as shown in the following figure.

Application Profiler also displays the location in the file system where the Notepad++ configuration changes where made. In this case, settings were written to a Notepad++ subfolder of the AppData folder.

7. Verify the Location of Application Configuration Changes

Open Windows Explorer and type %AppData%\Notepad++ into the text box for navigating the path. The %AppData% variable resolves to the correct location on the machine, and the contents of the Notepad++ folder are displayed, which include a configuration file.

8. Save the Config File

  1. Click the Save button, and select Save Config File.
  2. When prompted, provide a file name, such as NPP, and save the Application Profiler configuration files to the desktop.

In this exercise, you are creating a configuration file to enable application personalization by the end user, so that when an end user changes a Notepad++ preference, the user's preference will be saved across sessions and VMs.

Because you select Save Config File, rather than Save Config File with Predefined Settings, the preference settings you changed in this exercise will not be presented to end users. For more information, see Saving a Flex Configuration File With Predefined Settings. You changed preference settings in Notepad++ only so that Application Profiler could monitor and determine the path to the application configuration file.

9. Copy the Notepad++ Configuration Files

For the example in this exercise, the files you copy from the desktop of the provisioning machine are:

  • NPP.ico – The icon file.
  • NPP.ini – The application configuration file.
  • NPP.ini.flag – The flag file, which tells User Environment Manager to import settings when the application starts and export the user settings when the application closes.

10. Paste the Files in the Applications Folder on the Configuration Share

For the example in this exercise, the folder is located in \\<file-server>\UEM_Config\General\Applications.

Note: After you paste the files in this location, if you close the User Environment Manager Management Console and start it again, you see Notepad++ added to the list of applications being managed, as shown in the following figure. Also note that the NPP.ini.flag file enables DirectFlex for this application, and the path to the executable is recorded.

11. Log In to a Virtual Desktop as an End User

For the example in this exercise, we are using a Horizon 7 instant-clone desktop, and we access it through the VMware Workspace ONE catalog.

12. Start Notepad++ and Change Some Settings

  1. After login is complete, start the application, and select Settings > Preferences, and select Big icons.
  2. From the Localization list, select Deutsch and save the settings.

In Notepad++ the toolbar icons are now large and the menu names are displayed in German, as shown in the following figure.

13. Verify That Application Settings Are Saved to the Profile Archives

Navigate to the profile archive Applications folder for the user, and note that a new NPP.zip file has been created.

The NPP.zip file was created as soon as you started the application. For the example in this exercise, the path to this folder on the profile archives share is \\<file-share>\UEM_Profiles\<username>\Archives\

14. Log Out and Log In Again to See Persistent Settings

After you log out of the virtual desktop and log in again as the same user, when you start Notepad++, you see that your settings have been preserved.

If you are using a Horizon 7 instant-clone desktop, the VM that you first logged in to was destroyed, and this new desktop still displays the Notepad++ settings you chose using the previous VM.

If you are using a full-clone desktop, you might be able to replicate this experience by reverting the VM back to a snapshot taken before you ever logged in for the first time. When you log in after reverting, you will still see the personalized Notepad++ settings.

This exercise demonstrated profiling a simple application. For the applications that you need to profile for your company, if an application profile is not already included with the Easy Start feature, use the following resources to create an application profile template:

The following App Profiler video provides a detailed demonstration of the steps outlined in this exercise. If you need additional detail, you can find it here. If you already completed the Application Profiler exercise, feel free to skip the video. This video is 6 minutes.

Configure User Environment Settings

User environment settings include many different kinds of settings, some of which can be application-specific, and some can pertain to the user's whole virtual desktop environment. These are imported when the user logs in to the OS. For example, you can map a drive to a virtual desktop either when a user logs in to the OS or when a user starts a specific application. Besides configuring environment settings, you can specify the conditions under which the settings are applied, and you can specify which tasks might trigger a setting to be used.

To configure environment settings for a user's whole virtual desktop environment, you can click the User Environment tab at the top of the Management Console, as shown in the following figure.

As you can see, user environment settings include the following, among others:

  • Application Blocking – An advanced feature that is discussed in the later exercise Configure Application Blocking.
  • Drive Mappings – A feature that is explored in this exercise, but is applied to a specific application.
  • File Type Associations – A feature that is explored in this exercise, wherein you configure which application is used to open files with a specific file extension.
  • Horizon Smart Policies – A feature that integrates with Horizon 7, in which a number of key Horizon 7 features can be dynamically enabled or disabled based not only on who the user is, but on the many different variables available through Horizon 7: client device, IP address, pool name, and so on. For more information, see the chapter Horizon Smart Policies.
  • Privilege Elevation – An advanced feature that is discussed in the later exercise Configure Privilege Elevation for Installing an Application.
  • Shortcuts – A feature that lets you configure whether to use a desktop shortcut or a Program folders shortcut (or both), the shortcut name, the shortcut icon, and more. An introduction to this feature is provided in Test Application Personalization.

Providing exercises for all the different types of user environment settings is beyond the scope of this quick-start tutorial, but you can easily get an introduction by selecting items in the list and reviewing the user friendly control labels for each one in the Management Console. Also see Configuring User Environment Settings. For information about App Volumes settings, see VMware User Environment Manager with VMware App Volumes.

In addition to configuring settings for the whole desktop environment, you can configure settings based on which applications a user launches. To configure environment settings for a specific application, you can select the application in the list, and click the corresponding User Environment tab, as shown in the following figure.

You will use both types of User Environment tabs in this exercise.

Prerequisites

To perform this exercise, you need the following:

  • Notepad application listed as a managed application in the Management Console. This application is listed after you complete the exercise Enable the Easy Start Feature.
  • An Active Directory group containing an end-user account that you can use to log in to a virtual desktop. As part of this exercise, you will remove this user account from the AD group to test a conditional setting.
  • End-user credentials for that end-user account.
  • Credentials for the virtual or physical machine where you installed and performed the initial configuration of the User Environment Manager Management Console, as described in Configure the User Environment Manager Management Console.
  • One or more folders on a file-share server, to allow you to test drive mapping. For the example in this exercise, we created a Marketing file share, with the following path:

\\<file-server>\Marketing\

Inside the Marketing folder are the subfolders Docs, PPT Templates, and Reports.

Note: Throughout this exercise you will frequently change between your Windows end-point device where the User Environment Manager Agent is installed, and the physical or virtual machine where the Management Console is installed. It is recommended that you simply minimize the unused screen to streamline the testing process.

1. Create an Environment Setting for the Notepad Application

  1. In the User Environment Manager Management Console, select Notepad in the left pane.
  2. Select the DirectFlex tab, and select the Enable DirectFlex for this config file check box. Enabling DirectFlex is required for configuring application-specific user environment settings.
  3. Select the User Environment tab.

1.1. Add a Drive-Mapping User Environment Setting

  1. Select the Add button.
  2. Select Drive Mapping from the list.

1.2. Configure Drive Mapping for the Notepad Application

  1. In the Name text box, enter Map Drive with Notepad. This is the name of the setting as it appears in the User Environment Manager Management Console.
  2. For Drive letter, select a letter that is not already in use. For the example in this exercise, M is used.
  3. For Remote path, enter the path to the share that you want to map to a drive letter. For the example in this exercise, \\<file-server>\Marketing is used.
  4. For Friendly name, enter the name that you want end users to see in Windows Explorer next to the drive letter.
  5. Select the Undo at application exit check box. This setting unmaps the drive when the user closes the application.

The Run asynchronously check box is selected by default. This setting helps the drive-mapping process to complete quickly.

After you save the settings in the Drive Mapping dialog box, the new configuration is listed on the User Environment tab for Notepad, using the name you specified in the Name text box.

1.3. Save the Configuration to the Configuration File

Select Save Configuration in the main toolbar.

2. Log In to a Virtual Desktop and Test the Feature

Log in to the virtual desktop as an end user. For the example in this exercise, we are using a Horizon 7 instant-clone desktop, and we access it through the VMware Workspace ONE catalog.

2.1. Verify That the Drive Has Not Yet Been Mapped

Open Windows Explorer to view the drives mapped to the virtual desktop. Note that the drive you configured is not mapped yet because, at this point, you have logged in but not started the Notepad application.

2.2. Start Notepad and Verify That the Drive Is Mapped

  1. Start Notepad.
  2. Open Windows Explorer to view the drives mapped to the virtual desktop. Note that the drive you configured is now mapped.
    Note: If you do not see the mapped drive immediately, wait a few seconds and refresh the window.
  3. Close the Notepad application.
  4. Open Windows Explorer again and note that the drive has been unmapped.
  5. Log out of the virtual desktop.

2.3. Examine the Logs on the Profile Archives Share

Open the FlexEngine.log file in the Logs folder of the profile archives folder for the user, and verify that you see the line Successfully unmapped drive 'M:' ('Notepad.INI.Map Drive with Notepad').

For the example in this exercise, the path to this folder is \\<file-share>\UEM_Profiles\<username>\Archives\Logs. You can also search the file for all instances of the word "map" to find other entries for mapping events.

3. Create Conditions for the Drive-Mapping Setting

On the Personalization tab of the Management Console, select the Map Drive with Notepad setting, and select Edit.

3.1. Add a Condition for AD Group Membership

On the Conditions tab, select the Add button, and select Group Membership.

3.2. Select the AD Group

In the Group Membership dialog box, click Browse to search for and select the group.

This is the AD group mentioned in Prerequisites that contains an end-user account that you can use to log in to a virtual desktop. In this exercise, you will remove this user account from the AD group to test the conditional setting.

3.3. Add Another Condition for Windows Version

  1. On the Conditions tab, select the Add button, and select Windows Version.
  2. Select Windows 10, or whatever version of Windows is installed in the virtual desktop.

After you click Save, the condition is added to the Conditions tab, and is combined with the first condition, as shown in the following figure.

At this point in the exercise, the conditions for mapping a drive when the user starts the Notepad application are as follows: The user must be a member of a particular AD group (the Marketing group) and that the user must be logged in to a Windows 10 desktop.

Note: By default the AND operator is used when you add a condition, but you can select the condition and select Edit to change the default operator, as shown in the following figure. For this exercise, we use AND.

3.4. Save the Configuration to the Configuration File

Select Save Configuration in the main toolbar.

4. Test the Condition

In Active Directory Users and Groups, remove the end user from the AD group that you set up as part of the Prerequisites. For the example in this exercise, the group had only one member, which we removed.

4.1. Log In to the Virtual Desktop and Start Notepad

  1. Log in to the virtual desktop using the end-user account that you just deleted from the AD group.
  2. Start the Notepad application.
  3. Open Windows Explorer and note that the drive is not mapped to the virtual desktop. The drive is not mapped because the user does not meet the condition of belonging to the AD group.
  4. Close Notepad and log out of the virtual desktop.

4.2. Examine the Logs on the Profile Archives Share

Open the FlexEngine.log file in the Logs folder of the profile archives folder for the user, and verify that you see the line Conditons: Check for user membership of group '<group-name>' = false.

Note: You must have the log level set to DEBUG to see this entry. The entry that follows, however, is visible at the INFO level: Skipping drive mapping due to conditions.

For the example in this exercise, the path to this folder is \\<file-share>\UEM_Profiles\<username>\Archives\Logs.

At this point, you could add the user back to the AD group and then log in to the desktop again to verify that the drive will now be mapped when you start Notepad.

5. Test File Type Associations

  1. In the Management Console, select the User Environment tab.
  2. In the list, select File Type Associations.
  3. In the right pane, double-click abc.
  4. Review the Settings tab. With this setting, all files in the virtual desktop file system that use the file extension .abc are opened with the Notepad application.
  5. Select Cancel. You do not need to save the settings because these are the default settings included with Easy Start.

6. Create and Open a File with the ABC Extension

  1. Log in to the virtual desktop as an end user, and on the desktop, create a new text file with the .abc file extension.
  2. Double-click the file, and note that the default application used to open the file is Notepad.

Refreshing Settings Without Logging Out of the Desktop

For the steps in this exercise, after you created a new setting or changed a setting, you had to log in to the virtual desktop again to verify that the new setting was properly applied. However, you can use FlexEngine command-line commands on the virtual desktop to refresh environment settings so that you do not need to log out and log back in.

For example, when you are logged in to a virtual desktop as an end user, you can try changing the file type association for files with the .abc extension so that Microsoft Word opens them rather than Notepad. Or you could change which application shortcuts are created for one of the default applications, such as Notepad or Calculator.

After you make the change in the Management Console and save the configuration, on the virtual desktop, you can run the command to refresh the shortcuts and file type associations. For the example in this exercise, use the following command.

"c:\Program Files\Immidio\Flex Profiles\flexengine.exe" -UemRefresh

Different command-line options are provided for refreshing different types of settings. For more information, see FlexEngine Command-Line Arguments and Additional FlexEngine Operations. Besides running these commands on the virtual desktop, you can use these commands in scripts and logon tasks.

The following User Environment Settings video provides a detailed demonstration of the steps outlined in this exercise. If you need additional detail, you can find it here. If you already completed the User Environment Settings exercise, feel free to skip the video. This video is 5 minutes.